Aliens, Goodfellas, and Dark Knights, Oh My! Hollywood Crowns its Favorite Films

APP-1310127140-the-godfather-movie
WOZ_1
CitizenKane3
ShawshankRedemption
PulpFiction
ET
forrest_gump
Goodfellas-SD-O_ring_Af
silence_of_the_lambs
The-Breakfast-Club
OneFlewOverTheCuckoosNest
fightclub
TITANIC-3D-Movie-HQ-Stills-titanic-29239775-2000-1353
SomeLikeItHot
eternal_sunshine_of_the_spotless_mind_ver4
DarkNight
west_side_story_xlg
LionKing
Avatar
brokeback_mountain_xlg
inception-movie-poster
slumdog_millionaire_xlg
memento_xlg
Up-the-movie-pictures
APP-1310127140-the-godfather-movie WOZ_1 CitizenKane3 ShawshankRedemption PulpFiction ET forrest_gump Goodfellas-SD-O_ring_Af silence_of_the_lambs The-Breakfast-Club OneFlewOverTheCuckoosNest fightclub TITANIC-3D-Movie-HQ-Stills-titanic-29239775-2000-1353 SomeLikeItHot eternal_sunshine_of_the_spotless_mind_ver4 DarkNight west_side_story_xlg LionKing Avatar brokeback_mountain_xlg inception-movie-poster slumdog_millionaire_xlg memento_xlg Up-the-movie-pictures
By Angel Lenise July 02, 2014
No. 1. The Godfather, 1972.

Starring Marlon Brando, Al Pacino, James Caan.

Everyone’s favorite crime drama.

No. 2. The Wizard of Oz, 1939.

Starring Judy Garland, Frank Gordon, Ray Bolger, Jack Haley, Bert Lahr.

We’re not in Kansas, anymore.

No. 3. Citizen Kane, 1941.

Starring Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Dorothy Comingore.

An epic, inspired by William Randolph Hearst... and Rosebud.

No. 4. The Shawshank Redemption, 1994.

Starring Tim Robbins, Morgan Freeman, Bob Gunton.

Because all you need to break out of America’s most-corrupt prison is a poster of Raquel Welch.

No. 5. Pulp Fiction, 1994.

Starring John Travolta, Uma Thurman, Samuel L. Jackson.

Jackson’s Ezekiel 25:17 monologue. ‘Nuff said.

No. 8. E.T.: The Extraterrestrial, 1982.

Starring Henry Thomas, Drew Barrymore.

The reason we always want to phone home.

No. 14. Forrest Gump, 1994.

Starring Tom Hanks, Robin Wright, Gary Sinise.

Jenny never deserved Forrest’s love.

No. 19. Goodfellas, 1990.

Starring Ray Liotta, Al Pacino, and James Caan.

Everyone’s (other) favorite crime drama.

No. 22. The Silence of the Lambs, 1991.

Starring Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins.

“Hello, Clarice.”

No. 27. The Breakfast Club, 1985.

Starring Judd Nelson, Anthony Michael Hall, and Emilio Estevez.

If this is what detention looks like, sign us up.

No. 30. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, 1975.

Starring Jack Nicholson, Louise Fletcher, Danny DeVito.

“You're not nuts, you're fishermen!” If you say so, Nicholson.

No. 40. Fight Club, 1999.

Starring Brad Pitt, Edward Norton, and Helena Bonham Carter.

Who knew insomnia and soap would lead to all of this?

No. 45. Titanic, 1997.

Starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet.

All Rose had to do was not let Jack go.

No. 47. Some Like It Hot, 1959.

Starring Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis, Jack Lemmon.

A comedy from America’s biggest sex symbol was bound to appear.

No. 56. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, 2004.

Starring Jim Carrey, Kate Winslet, Kirsten Dunst.

There is hope for Joel and Clementine—memory-erasing procedures and all.

No. 57. The Dark Knight, 2008.

Starring Christian Bale, Michael Caine, Heath Ledger.

Critical acclaim aside, we remember this film most for Ledger’s riveting role, and posthumous Academy Award win.

No. 61. West Side Story, 1961.

Starring Rita Moreno, Richard Beymer, Natalie Wood.

Why, oh why, did Tony have to die?

No. 66. The Lion King, 1994.

Starring Matthew Broderick, James Earl Jones, Jeremy Irons.

This hakuna matata classic will never get old, even when we do.

No. 67. Avatar, 2009.

Starring Sam Worthington, Zoe Saldana, Sigourney Weaver.

James Cameron’s Pandora plight earned $2.7 billion at the box office. Need we say more?

No. 76. Brokeback Mountain, 2005.

Starring Heath Ledger, Jake Gyllenhaal, Anne Hathaway, Michelle Williams.

Another powerful performance from Ledger, accompanied by Gyllenhaal, helped the world fall for an unlikely love story.

No. 84. Inception, 2010.

Starring Leonardo DiCaprio Ellen Page, Tom Hardy, Joseph Gordon-Levitt.

It was all a dream?! Here’s to hopping that Cobb’s totem falls and he’s able to live, in the real world, happily, ever after.

No. 88. Slumdog Millionaire, 2008.

Starring Dev Patel, Freida Pinto.

This sleeper hit won eight of its ten Academy Awards nominations in 2008. We’d say it earned its keep.

No. 90. Memento, 2000.

Starring Guy Pearce, Carrie-Anne Moss, Joe Pantoliano.

Before Dark Knight, there was Christopher Nolan’s brilliant direction of Memento. Let’s just say we’ll never look at polaroids the same way again.

No. 92. Up, 2009.

Starring Ed Asner, Christopher Plummer.

We admit that Disney/Pixar’s 2009 hit drew tears to our eyes, with balloons that rivaled those of Jeff Koons.

The American Film Institute has done it. Just like the late, great Roger Ebert. Rotten Tomatoes even gave it a try. When it comes to ranking Hollywood’s best work, virtually every media outlet—reputable or not—has given its account. But finally, we’re hearing from the people who make movie magic a part of real life. As part of its July 4 issue, The Hollywood Reporter tallied over 2,000 studio executives, filmmakers, publicists, producers, actors, and scribes—from Disney chief Alan Horn to Boyz N the Hood director John Singleton—on their favorite films in Hollywood history. Expected works like The Godfather and Citizen Kane made the cut, while recent, commercial successes like Avatar and Inception earned their keep.
Read More