• "Failure meant a stripping away of the inessential. I stopped pretending to myself that I was anything other than what I was, and began to direct all my energy into finishing the only work that mattered to me. It is impossible to live without failing at something, unless you live so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all—in which case, you fail by default." – J.K. Rowling

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  • "I guess I pushed until I sputtered and fell over. Time passed. Attempts. Failures. More attempts. Everything involving "The Walls Around Us" came to be, and that was good. And through it all, and in the aftermath of "Walls," I’ve been thinking this: But wait. What kind of author do I really want to become?" – Nova Ren Suma

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  • "By the time I was fourteen, the nail in my wall would no longer support the weight of the rejection slips impaled upon it," he wrote. "I replaced the nail with a spike and went on writing." – Stephen King

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  • "I have no problem with failure; it is success that makes me sad. Failure is easy. I do it every day; I have been doing it for years... Even when I am pointed the right way and productive and finally published, I am not satisfied by the results." – Anne Enright

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  • "He bumped into a friend who had just become an editor at a publishing house in the children's section. Geisel told the friend that he'd simply given up and planned to destroy the book, but the editor asked to take a look. He said if he had been walking down the other side of the street, he probably would never have become a children's author." – Guy McLain (Springfield Museum) on Dr. Seuss

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  • "A few months later, I sent it to a few more agents. And received a few more rejections. Well, more like 15. I was a little less giddy this time, but I kept my chin up. 'Maybe the next book will be the one,' a friend said. Next book? I wasn’t about to move on to the next one just because of a few stupid letters. I wanted to write this book." – Kathryn Stockett, author of "The Help"

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  • According to the Huffington Post, newly declassified documents showing the inner workings of the world’s most prestigious literary prize have revealed that 50 years ago, Tolkien was rejected because "The Lord of the Rings" had "not in any way measured up to storytelling of the highest quality."

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