• Inkaterra is Peru's leading eco-tourism company with six hotels across the breadth of the country, offering guests a different and unique slice of this diverse country. Through authentic travel experiences, they perform scientific research defining natural areas where their luxury hotels are established, including the Amazon rainforest in Madre de Dios.

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  • Peru is perhaps best known for Machu Picchu, but Lake Titicaca - the largest lake in South America and straddling the border between Peru and Bolivia - draws a considerable number of tourists who flock to its man-made islands. With its smattering of naturally formed islands, Lake Titicaca’s vastness and beauty are beginning to eclipse many of Peru's other more recognisable tourist attractions.

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  • The Larco Museum in lima is housed in a former mansion, built on the site of a pre-Columbian temple. The museum offers a varied collection of 3,000 years of ceramic, textile and precious metal artifacts, as well as the largest collection of pre-Colombian art pieces in the world. during my visit, there was even a graphic ceramic exhibition of Inca-bonking and sex in the underworld.

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  • Cusco was once the capital of the Inca empire and is now known for its archaeological remains and Spanish colonial architecture. You should sit in one of the many beautiful squares and drink coca tea, watching the astonishing life of the city unfold. Light a candle in the Cathedral Basilica and try on alpaca socks in the gift shops. Be prepared, though, as the city has an altitude of 3,400m.

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  • The Nazca Lines are a series of hundreds of massive designs dug into the ground by the Nazca culture well over a millennium ago. Covering an area of nearly 1,000 km², there are about 300 different figures, including animals and plants, some of which measure 30 meters wide. Some are over 200 meters across and, therefore, the best way to see them is from above. Various tour operators offer flights.

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  • How about exploring the Peruvian Amazon? A lot of people think of Brazil when they hear Amazon Rainforest, however, while Brazil does house the majority share of the jungle, Peru is perhaps best placed for first-timers and those wishing to explore the stunning nature and biodiversity. Many indigenous tribes still live scattered throughout the Peruvian section of the Amazon.

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  • You can take a boat tour of the Islas Ballestas, the jewel in the crown of the Paracas National Wildlife Reserve in Peru. Here you'll find exotic species of birds and marine life, including Humboldt penguins and South American sea lions (once worshipped by the Moche people of ancient Peru). Boat tours leave from the nearby coastal town of Paracas and the sea can get rough, so be prepared.

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  • One of the world’s great wonders, Machu Picchu is the holy grail for any traveller visiting South America. A common misconception is that one needs to complete the four-day trek to reach this incredible sight. For many, surviving the Inca Trail is very much part of the Machu Picchu experience. You can arrive by coach and take a guided morning tour, although plan your day early to ensure entry.

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