• I got started in personal training. It's one of the most logical starting points because you can do it for a gym or independently. The hard thing is getting started and building clientele, and I suggest starting in a large gym to help with this. You likely won't get much per hour (maybe $10–$25 at first), but you'll learn a ton and build a following. I suggest NASM for your certification.

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  • The cool thing about teaching a fitness class is that you get paid to be a member of the class that you were going to attend anyway. I taught a boot camp class for a while, and I really enjoyed seeing members improve and getting results (although I was super-exhausted by the energy it takes). Expect to make $20–$30 per class at first, but you get paid lots of money as you build expertise.

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  • In my biased opinion, a blog is one of the most logical starting points for a fitness side career. You can start with virtually nothing and literally have it up and running in minutes. I honestly haven't made much from my blog, as I created it to drive traffic to other things, but I know of many bloggers who make $500–$2,500 per month, mainly from sponsored posts and ads.

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  • Owning your own gym will likely take up more time than being a side hustle, but it can be done on the side. I owned a studio for about six months (although it was more like a studio inside a larger gym), and although it wasn't easy, it was a cool experience. You need some funds to get it started, and it takes a while to grow, but you can definitely make it lucrative if you stick with it.

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  • What do companies like Strava, Fitbit, and ClassPass all have in common? They all have a ton of jobs that support the very business they operate. There are a ton of fitness startups and established companies that just may be looking for the very thing you do, whether it's in IT, journalism, or marketing. And the best thing about working in a company like this is you know they're all about fitness.

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  • I've never quite dabbled in fitness modeling, but I have seen a few projects cross my path, so I know that it's an avenue with some potential. Of course, you either need to have some major love for working out or some outstanding genetics—likely both! Just check out the Craigslist ads and you'll find tons of modeling gigs. Perhaps you do them for free initially, but eventually, you'll get paid.

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  • OK, real talk. I have a lot of different opinions about people who sell supplements, but it's not necessarily a bad thing (depending on the type of supplements) if you do it right. The supplement market is huge, and whether you're a fitness professional or not, it can prove to be very lucrative—it's literally how many big gyms really make their money.

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