• First up, the most important thing on this list: chips. I'm not talking about thinly sliced fried potatoes—in the U.K., we call those crisps. To us, chips are what you would call fries. It can get a bit confusing if you think about it too hard, so just know that if you see something like "burger and chips" on a menu in the U.K., don't worry—you're getting the right thing.

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  • If you fancy a refreshing glass of lemonade with your meal, be aware that lemonade in the U.K. is totally different to what you're used to in the U.S. Here, lemonade is usually colorless and carbonated—it's basically Sprite, but without the lime. We do also have "cloudy lemonade," which tastes marginally more "authentic," but we don't really have the kind of lemonade you're used to in the U.S.

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  • It's only polite to say "please" when ordering your meal in the U.K. Apparently, in the U.S., this isn't commonplace, but in the U.K., you would be considered impolite if you didn't say "please" and "thank you" to your waiter.

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  • The actual food that you can expect to find on a menu is very different in the U.K., especially when it comes to breakfast. Here, doughnuts and muffins aren't breakfast—they're dessert. Burritos aren't breakfast either—they're dinner. In the U.K., a typical breakfast at a cafe or restaurant would involve baked beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, eggs—and for the meat eaters, bacon and sausages.

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  • It seems to be the case that in the U.S., plates are often cleared away while some people at the table are still eating. This almost never happens in the U.K.—the waiter will wait for the whole party to be finished before clearing the plates away. So don't be offended if you're left with an empty plate in front of you for a while before it's taken away.

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  • In the U.S., the bill (check) is usually brought to the table by the waiter as soon as you've finished eating. This would be considered very rude in the U.K., as if the waiter were trying to hurry you out: What if you wanted dessert, another drink, or just to sit and chat for a while? In the U.K., you need to ask for your bill to be brought out when you're ready to leave.

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  • Be sure to note whether a tip has already been included on your bill. If it has, then you're not required to leave anything extra unless you want to. If it hasn't, leaving a tip in cash is best, as it will go straight to your waiter (tips added to credit card payments often go to the restaurant instead). In the U.K., we don't tip as much as you do in the U.S.—10 percent is usual for good service.

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