• Erin Nicole recently gave up posting to Instagram due to the competitive nature it can foster, and she says she'll likely never go back. She is happier and more present in the moment and speaks to her friends in person more often. However, she does feel like she's missing out on seeing photos of her friends and believes that her lack of a social media presence may limit job opportunities.

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  • After a breakup, Dmitry Samarov quit Twitter because one of the things that his ex criticized him for was his constant smartphone use. He went on to delete Instagram and subsequently decided to get a flip phone. He says that, in the end, he felt like he woke up from a dream. He had more face-to-face encounters and time to read and felt more present in his surrounding environment.

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  • Alexa Goins learned three things in the four months during which she gave up social media: 1. We would be happier if we stopped comparing ourselves to others. 2. FOMO can keep you from doing what you want to do. 3. Likes mean nothing, and we shouldn't use them to measure our worth. Next time you are posting a status update, consider asking yourself why: Is it to boost your ego or get approval?

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  • Huffington Post's Jordan K. Turgeon went on a 30-day detox from social media and never really returned—except to Twitter for work. Turgeon says that, initially, she felt disconnected, but the need to be connected to so many people went away over time. She also realized that she didn't really care about trivial status updates and didn't need to be on Facebook or Instagram.

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  • Jeannie Kim did a two-week social media fast. Beforehand, she spent most of her evenings on Facebook, which she now calls a "time suck." One of the most important lessons Kim learned in the process was that, for her, Facebook was a bad habit rather than an addiction. By going completely cold turkey, she interrupted the habit, and she now knows that she can go without it.

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  • Jon Acuff took a 10-day break from social media and learned seven things in the process. One? He often used his phone to fill quiet moments. A good question to ask yourself is this: "Are you hiding from being in the present moment?" Additionally, while on his break, he observed several people spending dinner on their phones rather than talking to each other.

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  • When faced with the onset of depression, Karen Arends quit social media for a week. She wrote this essay for Wit and Delight to discuss the link between social sharing and one's mental well-being. By taking an introspective look at her own behavior, withdrawals, and coping mechanisms, she concluded one thing: Social media itself isn't the problem—the issue has to do with how people use it.

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