• Trying for a baby is great when things go well and you fall pregnant after a few months, but what about when things don’t go your way? The emotions of getting nowhere can take its toll on your mental health. There’s lots of advice to help you prepare physically to conceive, but not enough on the mental and emotional aspects of waiting for that pregnancy test to show positive.

    • 1 of 7
  • Postnatal depression has been better documented recently, but what about pre-birth? Mental health issues during pregnancy are rarely discussed, but many things can trigger them. Feeling guilty around friends who can’t have children or have recently miscarried, or a negative reaction to your pregnancy at work, money worries or doubts about your skills as a mother can all bring this on.

    • 2 of 7
  • Birthing anxiety can affect every mum-to-be. The fear of the unknown and pain, coupled with all the horror stories people are so fond of telling you about their own experiences, is a heady mix. No wonder it's on your mind as your pregnancy progresses. It's not unheard of for this fear to be so strong it causes anxiety or panic attacks. Don't ignore your concerns; there's help available.

    • 3 of 7
  • Help, support and advice for postnatal depression are getting better, but it’s still not easy to deal with if you have it yourself. Knowing the signs and getting early treatment is the key. Often recognising those signs can come from talking to other mums. Being open and honest with them – and yourself – is important, especially in the first few weeks of new motherhood.

    • 4 of 7
  • Don’t be fooled into thinking that postnatal mental health issues will only strike in those first weeks and months after childbirth. Motherhood is for life and so too are the mental health issues that can surround it. At times, it’s the high pressure of a stressful job, but to keep a family happy you have to keep yourself happy, too. Don’t be frightened to take some time out for yourself.

    • 5 of 7
  • The emotional effects of miscarriage should never be underestimated. They can be far-reaching and long-lasting. Being told, "Well, you can just try again after a month or two" may be true physically, but that doesn't cut it mentally. Give yourself time to grieve, to come to terms with what happened, and listen to your own needs and that of your partner.

    • 6 of 7
  • Emotional well-being is important at every stage of motherhood. You never stop being a mum; even as your children grow into adulthood themselves, new and challenging anxieties can present themselves. It’s not just having a baby that can affect your mental health. Talk openly about your feelings, as early as possible. You're never alone, and you won't be the only one to ever feel that way either.

    • 7 of 7
Go to top