• Have you ever thought about why you would want your wisdom teeth removed? Is it because the doctor said, "It's for the best," "Better safe than sorry," "It's a minor surgery, so why not do it?" or "Everybody does it." Or is it because you have a real problem with one or more wisdom teeth? Don't base your decisions on what other people think or do—based them on your intuition and knowledge.

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  • Do your teeth hurt? Did you notice any swelling or pain that lasted for many days? I have one wisdom tooth that has a cavity, but it does not hurt, so my approach would be for my dentist to fix it instead of taking it out. At least try it. If in the future, it starts to hurt, then I will have to take it out, but I would like to make sure that I know what I am getting into. Wouldn't you?

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  • Did you know that a "2011 study of more than 6,000 patients in Greece found that only 2.7 percent of intact wisdom teeth result in problems"? Why would we all do it if only around 3 percent could actually benefit from it? Isn't it just an unnecessary precaution? Why would you endure pain, pay money, and risk a 7–10 percent chance of surgical complication? Make sure you know what you're deciding.

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  • Did you know that each tooth corresponds to at least one organ? According to Chinese medicine, every time you have tooth decay or take out a certain tooth, it indicates that certain organs are in trouble. Why would you take out a healthy wisdom tooth and mess with your energy points and send weird signals to your organs? Why not be integrative and keep them in since they do not hurt?

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  • Since I was little, doctors kept on telling my parents and me that if I do not remove my wisdom teeth, then the other teeth will shift and be too crowded. I was always scared of this and kept checking in the mirror for years to see if it was happening. Finally, I can put an end to this since it's only a myth. It looks like it's not true, so don't take them out based on this principle solely.

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  • Another myth that is widely spread is that "Most wisdom teeth cause problems," so why not take them out before you are sorry? It's like taking out your appendix just because many appendixes need to be taken out, so why not get the surgery sooner? Does this seem like a great idea? For me, it seems like a waste of surgery just because we are scared that, one day, this may hurt.

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  • Did anybody talk to you about the risks involved? All I heard was, "You might experience some swelling and bruises," and that was it. In fact, there is so much more to it, like trismus (lockjaw), hemorrhage, alveolar osteitis (dry socket), and periodontal damage—just to name a few. It's not as innocent as it sounds to remove a wisdom tooth, so please ask your doctor for more information.

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  • The only time you should remove your wisdom teeth is when you experience dental caries (if they can fix them, perfect; if not, it's better to take the tooth out so it won't infect the ones next to it), gum disease, pericoronitis, cellulitis, or abscesses. In these cases, it's better to undergo a surgery (extraction) to be safe. But make sure that you are not basing your decision on myths.

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