Teri Hatcher Talks Men and Perimenopause in <i>Prevention</i>

By  May 06, 2011

Desperate Housewives star Teri Hatcher, opens up in the June issue of Prevention about a series of health issues she’s faced this past year including cracked ribs and a “frozen shoulder.”  Despite her setbacks, this not-so ordinary housewife shares details on finding a man, where she stands on plastic surgery, and which foods she chooses to indulge on.

On what she been through lately:
I’ve had a really rough year.  It’s been excruciating and crazy.  This is basically the journey: When I turned forty-five, I was in amazing shape.  I had done a triathlon.  I was happy in my workouts and felt super strong.  Shortly after that, I cracked two ribs at home falling off a ladder in my backyard.  I was spray painting the backdrop of a castle and a town for the musical Into the Woods for my daughter’s birthday.  I was at the highest rung of the ladder in my Uggs when I slipped and fell midback onto the corner of the stage.  Of course I thought I was dead or paralyzed.  Then I broke two ribs on the DH set while I was doing a pole-dancing scene. That was on my forty-fifth birthday-December 8, 2009.

On what caused her frozen shoulder:
I’ve been to three doctors.  I’ve been told women get it between forty-five and fifty-five, usually in their nondominant arm.  It’s sometimes associated with perimenopause, which I’m not in according to my bloodwork.  It usually lasts about two years and then magically goes away.  But nobody talks about it, so you think your insane.  It doesn’t even sound like a real disease, but it’s debilitating.

On the different treatments she’s tried for her frozen shoulder:
Everyone has come out of the woodwork with reflexology, physical therapy, raw food.  There’s not a thing I haven’t tried, even cortisone shots.  There’s some relief for a little bit- but then not really.  I’ve gone back and forth with sleeping aids of Advil, or stronger.  I don’t like the way any of that makes me feel.  I’m not giving up.  I’m going to try more physical therapy, which is excruciating.


On her low points with frozen shoulder:
One horrible moment was me sobbing in my closet because moving my arm to put on clothes hurt so much.  I called Emerson.  She came in and I said, “You’ve hit bottom when you have to ask your thirteen-year-old to help hook your bra.”

On Meeting a man:
The next day we were going on rides.  This guy came up to me and said, “do I know you?”  he seemed nice.  We talked. So he walked away and my girlfriend goes, “Should I see if he’s single?”  I go, “Yes.” She runs over, gets his card.  We went on a date, didn’t work out.  Fine.  The point is, I’m actively trying in a different way.  Since then, I’ve gone on a date with a very attractive man and it was a terrific example of me manifesting this conscious change and taking responsibility for why I may have unconsciously been keeping relationships at bay.  By no means am I in one, but I have three guys calling at the moment, and that’s different from before.

On her ideal guy:
I’m all over the map.  I want to have an open mind. I’d like him to be between thirty-nine and fifty-four.  Fun, adventurous, funny, kind, honest, smart. Successful- but I want to be clear that doesn’t necessarily mean rich.

See the full interview in the June issue of Prevention.