• Next to Agios Sostis is Kiki’s Taverna, one of the island’s best restaurants and worst-kept secrets. The lineup regularly tops 2 hours (no reservations, no exceptions, even for Kimye, who are rumoured to have dropped by) but the food is worth the wait. I had fresh fish and a large platter of meze-type salads.

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  • Mykonos Town (known as Chora to the locals) is a winding maze of cobblestone streets. You need at least an afternoon to explore the local restaurants and boutiques (I spent three evenings in town), plus added time for getting lost. A little history: Chora’s labyrinth design was a purposeful attempt to ward off looting pirates who regularly attacked the city up until the end of the 18th century.

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  • Despite its name, you'll find Little Venice in Mykonos. This stretch of buildings and bars, named for its resemblance to Venetian architecture, where façades rise straight up from the canals, is a popular spot to go for cocktails at sunset. Blogger Anna Tsoulogiannis (Anna With Love) visited last month, and her dreamy shots of this trattoria look so good I can almost taste the sangria. Cheers!

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  • I’m not much of a night owl, but the owners of the Sangiorgio resort opened Scorpios earlier this year, and the description of the hot spot on JetSetReport sealed the deal for me: It's a "mix of Burning Man and DJ-curated beach club," known for "incredible sunset parties" in the summer that attract "the best music talent on the island.” So, fine. One night of sleep deprivation won’t kill me.

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  • My inner neat freak abhors tchotchke souvenirs, but Love Greece is different. The company makes products that are 100% made in Greece with only the finest Greek raw materials and local production. Plus, their totes and tees are actually pretty cool.

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  • Before I arrived in Mykonos, a friend of mine who summers in Rhodes told me the only Greek I’d need to know: “Etsi einai e zoe” ("That’s life"), and it's delivered best with a casual shrug. Business is slow? Etsi einai e zoe. Car ran out of gas? Etsi einai e zoe. But in case you need a few more words to get by, these essential Greek phrases (and phonetic pronunciations) should come in handy.

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  • This wasn’t my first time at this rodeo. For a peek at my last trip, plus a few more places to eat, shop, and see, check out this travel guide on my blog.

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