Christina Hendricks Chats About Her New Blonde ‘Do, Mad Men, and Much More

Author:
Publish date:
placeholder

You can’t call Christina Hendricks “Red” any more, as the Mad Men star recently lightened her locks to a honey-hued blonde with help from Clairol’s Nice ‘n Easy. The new hue marks her adieu to the iconic show, as well as a challenge for mane mavens who may be hesitant about dyeing their locks. Her solution is simple: #ShiftaShade to a new hue and see how it shakes things up. Glam sat down with star to reflect on her color change, her style and beauty cues, and even find out where she sees Joan after the series finale.

On Going Blonde: It’s been a long time; it’s been 20 years. First of all, it was an easy process, and I’ve only been blonde for a short while. I’m enjoying it; every time I look in the mirror, I’m a little bit surprised. I forget, and I think, “Oh yeah, this is fun! It’s new.” It was really fun because to me, it’s something I’ve used since I was a teenager, so I know how to use it – I use it all of the time. We had talked about doing colors inspired by the red I was, and then I had told them I was actually thinking about going blonde. So we ended up going two-fold, and now here’s going to be a line of red and a line of blonde.

For Those Who Are Afraid of Dyeing Their Hair: You can shift a shade, and it doesn’t have to be this big dramatic move where everything has to change. It can be just for fun. I’m sure I’ll want to play around with my makeup and change some things; some things will probably works that didn’t before and vice versa. It’s easy to do. It’s not like you’re going to have to empty your wardrobe and start all over. Really, it’s just being playful and being open-minded and maybe being able to express a different side of yourself. I know that when I get a haircut or when I change my hair color, you sort of experiment with your personality a little bit, I think. Sometimes you need a little jumpstart like that; it should always be fun.

On Her Style Icons and Favorite Designers: I really love Florence Welch. I think she’s beautiful, cool, chic woman. And I think Charlotte Gainsbourg is pretty cool. I think Kirsten Dunst looks pretty great. Going back, Katherine Hepburn, Marilyn Monroe, Sophia Loren, and Debbie Harry all of those women – very different, all completely different, and all unique.

I saw Zac [Posen’s] show and it was absolutely beautiful. It was different for him, quite different. But I have to be honest, I still haven’t gone to Style.com and seen everything yet. I’ve been so busy, but that’s how I usually catch up and see all of the shows is I go to Style.com and scroll down. I have to say, I’ve loved everything Michael Kors has been doing for a while and Valentino just blows my mind. I mean, it’s just so ethereal and so outrageously beautiful. Also Etro, I’m really loving what they’re doing. But I have to see all of the New York shows though. 

On Who She Almost Played on Mad Men and Where She Sees Joan in the ‘70s: I just want to play Joan – I mean I want to play all of them, but everyone was so fantastic in the role they played. It’s hard to see anyone else. But when I read the first script before anyone had been cast, I auditioned for Joan and then I auditioned for the Midge role, which in the pilot was Don’s mistress. She was an artist and she was wearing a kimono and on paper, I thought, “Oooh, this is the fun role,” because the other was a secretary who walked around bossing people around. I had this sort of image in my head. In fact, when I went to audition for it I wore this sheer kimono and jeans rolled up and little high heels – it was much more my look. And no one knew which characters were going to last and which ones weren’t, so I turned to my manager, and I said, “I just want the one that lasts the longest.” Not that I had a choice in the matter, but luckily, the one I got was the one that lasted the longest. 

We left off in the beginning of Season A, I feel like she was really reaching her stride, and she was a partner, figuring out how to be a single mother. And I would like to think in the ‘70s, she would continue to be successful and raise her son well and fall in love. Joan always wanted to fall in love, so I would hope she lives happily ever. 

On Her Biopic Choice: I think it would be interesting to portray someone like Isadora Duncan. I find her extraordinary, and she had an interesting life. But that’s just one idea.