Haters Gonna Hate: Taylor Swift Zooms in on TIME and Businessweek - Glam

Haters Gonna Hate: Taylor Swift Zooms in on TIME and Businessweek

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You can’t escape Taylor Swift. From the top of the Billboard 200 and Hot 100 charts, to Thanksgiving dinner, and radio airways in between, the purveyor of 1989 pop is everywhere. So why not get up close and personal with music’s shining star?!

Swift is taking over newsstands this week, not just on the fashion front with (eyebrows on the cover of) Wonderlandbut also on the business and news scene with Businessweek and TIME. The country crooner-turned-pop princess dropped the only album to go platinum in 2014; in fact, her latest LP sold nearly 1.3 million copies in its first week—more than enough ammo to prove she doesn’t need Spotify. So it’s no wonder two glossies on the hard news circuit are deeming her a power player like we haven’t seen before.

While Businessweek didn’t speak to Swift for its feature, TIME explored plenty with the star, from her influence over young girls to her impending tour. Check out some of the highlights below.

On why she left Spotify:

“Well, they can still listen to my music if they get it on iTunes. I’m always up for trying something. And I tried it and I didn’t like the way it felt. I think there should be an inherent value placed on art. I didn’t see that happening, perception-wise, when I put my music on Spotify. Everybody’s complaining about how music sales are shrinking, but nobody’s changing the way they’re doing things. They keep running towards streaming, which is, for the most part, what has been shrinking the numbers of paid album sales.”

On the risks she took with 1989:

“When I put forth an album cover that didn’t have half my face on it, and tried to convince my label that this was the best way to sell an album, you know, I got some kind of interesting side-glance looks. But I knew that this was the best cover to represent this record, because I wanted there to be an air of mystery. I didn’t want people to know the emotional DNA of this album. I didn’t want them to see a smiling picture on the cover and think this was a happy album, or see a sad-looking facial expression and think, oh, this is another breakup record. When I wanted to call the album 1989, people on the team questioned that. Every single element of this album has been called into question, and I’ve had to say ‘No, this is how we’re doing it.’ And the fact that we came out and did the kind of numbers we did in the first week—you have no idea how relieved I was, because it was all on me if this didn’t work.”

On how songwriting keeps her grounded:

“I see a lot of celebrities build up these emotional walls around themselves, where they let no one in, and that’s what makes them feel very lonely at the top. I just keep writing songs. And I kind of stay open to feeling humiliated and rejected, because before being a quote-unquote celebrity, I’m a songwriter. Being a celebrity means you lock your doors and close your windows and don’t let people in. Being a songwriter means you’re very attuned to your own intuition and your own feelings even if they hurt.”

On her surprising role models:

“I do have female role models in the sense of actresses like Mariska Hargitay. I think she has a beautiful life, and an incredible career, and I think she’s built that for herself. She’s one of the highest paid actresses—actors in general, women or men—on television, and she’s been playing this very strong female character for, what, 15 years now, something like that. And Ina Garten, the Barefoot Contessa. I really love her business, and how she sticks to who she is, and how people relate to it. In other industries, I have female role models.”

On growing up as a woman in music:

“I just struggle to find a woman in music who hasn’t been completely picked apart by the media, or scrutinized and criticized for aging, or criticized for fighting aging—it just seems to be much more difficult to be a woman in music and to grow older. I just really hope that I will choose to do it as gracefully as possible.”

On being a role model herself:

“I’ve struggled with a lot of things, but the idea that you’re living your life and it’s impacting other people, some of whom are very young, some of whom are in their most impressionable times and they’re discovering the music that tells them how they are going to live their lives and how they should feel and how it’s acceptable to feel, I think that that’s kind of exciting.”

On the 1989 tour:

“If you look at the makeup of my previous music, as far as production elements go, there are a lot of live drums, acoustic guitars, electric guitars, and live bass. And if you look at the landscape of 1989, it’s mostly synths and automated drums and these kind of big epic synth pad sounds, and key bass, and layered vocals. I have a very big band, there are, what, 14 of us, so what you’re going to end up with is more of a live feel in that it’s going to be filled in and more dramatic with more layers to it, but never to the point where it’s going to feel noisy or overcrowded. The music on this tour is going to live a little bit in that world, and thank God, my fans really seem to like that world.”