Lizzo Is Tired Of Being Called Brave For Being Confident

Lizzo
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Lizzo has taken the world by storm with her empowering lyrics, dynamite live performances, and candidness on social media. A common thread through it all is her unyielding confidence and self-love. I mean, just take her biggest song, “Truth Hurts.” It’s basically an anthem for any woman who’s ever been made to feel less than by a shady dude (so, like every woman). But while the singer is happily embracing the label of “confident woman,” she doesn’t want to be called brave for it.

In a recent interview with Glamour, Lizzo gets real about the plus-size double standard. “When people look at my body and be like, ‘Oh my God, she’s so brave,’ it’s like, ‘No I’m not,'” she said. “I’m just fine. I’m just me. I’m just sexy. If you saw Anne Hathaway in a bikini on a billboard, you wouldn’t call her brave. I just think there’s a double standard when it comes to women.”

 

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I’m not bad, I was just drawn this way.. 😏😘

A post shared by Lizzo (@lizzobeeating) on

It shouldn’t be shocking that a full-figured woman loves herself. Instead, Lizzo says, we should give every woman the chance to be who she is, without expectations.

“Let’s just make space for these women,” she continues. “Make space for me. Make space for this generation of artists who are really fearless in self-love. They’re out here. They want to be free. I think allowing that space to be made is really what’s going to shift the narrative in the future. Let’s stop talking about it and make more space for people who are about it.”

Of course, Lizzo isn’t the first plus-size star to be applauded for her confidence. Back in 2014, actress Mindy Kaling was praised for saying she doesn’t want to be skinny, a reaction that she found confusing. “People were like, ‘That’s so great that you said it,'” she told Jimmy Kimmel. “And I didn’t think that was so weird. Every woman I know feels that way.”

 

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Every woman on that stage had a story of either why they shouldn’t have been on that stage or why they didn’t believe they deserved to be on that stage, including myself. “Imposter syndrome” is a privilege to the most marginalized group in America. Not only were we taught to believe we didn’t belong in the spotlight, but when we finally get to a place to self-worth the world tries to knock us down. Not this time. The world smiled with us. The world sang us. The world saw our beauty last night. The world saw black women feeling Good As Hell and cheered us on. Thank you to the best team on the planet @quinnwilsonn @jemelmcwilliams @marko_monroe @iwantalexx @theshelbyswain and a huge I love you to my beautiful heavenly dancers and singers. Being a big black woman with y’all by my side is the honor of my life, and I hope this moment stays forever between yo titties.

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Lizzo’s performance at the VMAs this week proved that we’re moving forward beyond this way of thinking. On Instagram, she wrote about why she chose to have a group of black women of different shapes and sizes on stage with her. “Every woman on that stage had a story of either why they shouldn’t have been on that stage or why they didn’t believe they deserved to be on that stage, including myself,” she wrote. “Not only were we taught to believe we didn’t belong in the spotlight, but when we finally get to a place to self-worth the world tries to knock us down. Not this time. The world smiled with us. The world sang [with] us.”

Preach!

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