The Most Important Place To Use Sun Protection That You're Probably Missing

If you didn't know by now, applying sunscreen is one of the most crucial steps in our daily skincare routine. Whether the sun is out or not, sunscreen is mandatory for your skin health. The American Academy of Dermatology warns that your skin is always at risk of UV rays, even if it's cloudy outside. Sunscreen is the best way to help protect yourself against skin cancer and premature aging caused by UV rays.

Even though sunscreen is important in our daily routines, many fail to apply it correctly. Sunscreen should be reapplied consistently throughout the day — and generously. By applying sunscreen correctly, you could be saving yourself from having to use anti-aging products down the road.

To apply sunscreen correctly, you first have to know where to apply it. With so many applicators and formulas available, it's easy to get confused about where you should be applying sunscreen. So, how do we know we are applying sunscreen correctly?

Where you should be applying sunscreen

According to dermatologist Orit Markowitz, one of the places that frequently goes unprotected is the scalp (via Byrdie). Because we tend to not think of the scalp as an area that could get sunburned, it often doesn't get the love it needs. Markowitz suggests we apply sunscreen on the scalp in either a dedicated hair sunscreen mist or in powder form. This is to get sun protection without making your hair greasy with regular sunscreen.

As noted by Good Housekeeping, any place that is uncovered has the risk of being sunburned. This is why you should also cover your hands, feet, lips, and the area around your eyes. For your lips, use chapstick or lip balm that contains SPF to get sun protection. To better cover your body with sunscreen, you should apply sunscreen before getting dressed. Moreover, make sure to let the sunscreen soak in and dry before putting on your clothes. Prevention.com also recommends you take the time to apply a generous, even amount to your hands before heading out into the sun.